‘hit squad sent his fingers back to bin Salman to prove mission’s success’

  • Turkey intercepted 14 phone calls by Major General Maher Absulaziz Mutrib
  • It was claimed seven were to the office of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman
  • Mutrib has been described as the ‘spinal cord’ of 15-strong Saudi death squad
  • Hit squad ‘sent Khashoggi’s fingers back to Riyadh to prove mission’s success’
  • Turkey’s President Erdogan  is set to reveal the ‘naked truth’ over the killing today
  • Saudi foreign minister has insisted ‘something like this can never happen again’ 
  • Merkel called killing a ‘monstrosity’ and will halt German arms exports to Riyadh

Dailymail


A hitman made seven calls to the Saudi Crown Prince’s private office on the day Jamal Khashoggi was killed, it was claimed last night.

Turkish intelligence agencies intercepted 14 phone calls by Major General Maher Abdulaziz Mutrib, a former diplomat who was once posted to Britain.

Seven of them were to the office of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman – the contents of which would be ‘explosive’ if leaked, a source claimed.

Mutrib, who was pictured outside Downing Street in March during the Crown Prince’s state visit, was described as the ‘spinal cord’ of a Saudi death squad.

Major General Maher Abdulaziz Mutrib, pictured outside Downing Street in March during the Crown Prince’s state visit, was described as the ‘spinal cord’ of a Saudi death squad

Major General Maher Abdulaziz Mutrib, pictured outside Downing Street in March during the Crown Prince’s state visit, was described as the ‘spinal cord’ of a Saudi death squad

Disguise: Madani, circled, was also wearing a fake beard

Job done: The Saudi then changed back into his own clothes

Left – disguise: Madani, circled, was also wearing a fake beard. Right – Job done: The Saudi then changed back into his own clothes

It comes as US President Donald Trump (right) said he was 'not satisfied' with Riyadh's explanation of the Washington Post contributor's death in a case has tarnished the image of powerful Saudi Crown Prince (left)

It comes as US President Donald Trump (right) said he was ‘not satisfied’ with Riyadh’s explanation of the Washington Post contributor’s death in a case has tarnished the image of powerful Saudi Crown Prince (left)

The allegations are yet further evidence that point the finger at Saudi Arabia’s de-facto ruler.

It comes after a top Saudi minister admitted for the first time that journalist Mr Khashoggi, 59, was murdered at his country’s consulate in Istanbul on October 2.

He blamed a ‘rogue operation’ for the killing, which has sparked an international outcry and plunged the kingdom into a diplomatic crisis.

A source told online news service Middle East Eye that members of the hit squad sent Mr Khashoggi’s fingers back to Riyadh to prove the mission’s success and they were presented to the Crown Prince.