Thai police have revealed Shane Warne was suffering chest pains before he left Australia for a holiday in Koh Samui.

Police Colonel Yuthana Sirisombat told reporters on Saturday night his family had informed them of the late cricket legend’s history of heart disease and asthma and their concern about his health before he left Australia last week.

The 52-year-old had recently “seen a doctor about his heart”, Sirisombat said.

Thai Police have reported a “large amount of blood” found in the room of Shane Warne at the rented villa he was staying at in Koh Samui. Despite the latest revelations Police don’t believe there was any foul-play involved in Mr. Warne’s demise.

New photographs have emerged of the room where Mr. Warne was staying at the Samujana Villas in the popular Bhoput district of the island.

Blood stains were identified on the carpet, on 3 towels and a pillow, according to Thai-language newspaper Matichon.

Pol Maj Gen Satit Polpinit, commander of Surat Thani Provincial Police told Matichon that blood stains were found in the room as police continued their investigation.

“A large amount of blood was found in the room. When CPR was started, the deceased had coughed up liquid and was bleeding.”

Mr. Warne has gone for a nap on Friday afternoon after he and his three friends had decided to meet at 5pm for a drink. At 5.15pm Andrew Neophitou, one of the three friends, went to wake Shane from his slumbers but found him unresponsive.

Colonel Sirisombat said it was these family revelations — and a review of CCTV footage — that led police to rule out any foul play in the father-of-three’s death.

Warne’s body has been sent to Suratthani Hospital for an autopsy, as his family fights for it to be returned to Australia as soon as possible.

It comes after blood stains were spotted in Warne’s room.

New photographs have emerged of where the Spin King was staying at the Samujana Villas resort.

Various reports claim blood stains were seen on the carpet and on three towels and a pillow, reportedly from Warne during the desperate attempts made to save his life.

“A large amount of blood was found in the room,” Pol Maj Gen Satit Polpinit, commander of Surat Thani Provincial Police, told Thai newspaper Matichon. “

When CPR was started, the deceased had coughed up liquid and was bleeding.”

Police inside the villa on Koh Samui, Thailand, where cricketer Shane Warne was found dead from an apparent heart attack. Source: Royal Thai Police via Matichon online

Police inside the villa on Koh Samui, Thailand, where cricketer Shane Warne was found dead from an apparent heart attack. Source: Royal Thai Police via Matichon online

Police examine the scene. Source: Royal Thai Police via Matichon online

Police examine the scene. Source: Royal Thai Police via Matichon online

‘He hated drugs’

A masseuse had visited Warne on Friday but police were not clear on what time of the day.

Around 5.15pm he was found face down on his bed after a suspected heart attack by close friend Andrew Neophitou, who was an executive producer on a recently released documentary on Warne’s life.

The first day of the Test match between Australian and Pakistan was playing on the television in his room.

“They were meant to meet some people at 5pm. Neo was next door, he’s always on time,” Warne’s long-time manager James Erskine told The Age.

“He realised he wasn’t well. He tried to give mouth-to-mouth, tried to resuscitate him, he had no heartbeat, the ambulance came 20 minutes later and an hour and a bit later he was pronounced dead.”

Police confirmed no drugs were found in the room but took samples from a water bottle.

Erskine rejected any claims Warne’s death was linked to his reputation as a man who liked to party. He was visiting close friend Gareth Edwards, a poker-playing mate who runs the resort, to begin what was supposed to be a three-month trip.

“He was on holiday, having a lie down, siesta, he hadn’t been drinking, he’d been on this diet to lose weight,” he said.

“He didn’t drink much. Everyone thinks he’s a big boozer but he’s not a big boozer at all. I sent him a crate of wine, 10 years later it’s still there. He doesn’t drink, never took drugs, ever. He hated drugs so nothing untoward.”

Former Australian captain Greg Chappell echoed Erskine’s remarks on Sky Sports: “He hated drugs. He didn’t need drugs. He was high on life.”

Thai police said Shane Warne's family said he had a history of heart problems.

Thai police said Shane Warne’s family said he had a history of heart problems.

The group of friends Warne was holidaying with talk to police. Picture: Bo Phut Police Station/Handout

The group of friends Warne was holidaying with talk to police. Picture: Bo Phut Police Station/Handout

It came after Aussie cricket great Ian Healy said he was not surprised by Warne’s premature death.

Healy said he was worried Warne would have been battling cancer at a young age. “An early passing didn’t surprise me for Warnie,” Healy told The Today Show on Saturday.

“He didn’t look after his body that well. He yo-yoed up and down.

“He didn’t put much sunscreen on. I thought it would have become skin issues for him over time, but not at 52. And he would have been full of beans right to the end, I bet.”

Back in August last year Shane tested postive for Covid 19 according to news.com.au at the time.

Shane Warne is self-isolating after testing positive to coronavirus in the UK.

Warne, who is the head coach for the men’s London Spirit cricket team, began to feel unwell on Sunday morning and returned a positive lateral flow test hours later.

He is now awaiting the results of a PCR test – a more sensitive test used to detect the level of coronavirus in his body.

Warne is fully vaccinated against coronavirus, having received two doses of Pfizer earlier this month.

I had the Pfizer, I had to wait til they released it for over 50s so I could get it done,’’ Warne told the Herald Sun.

“It made me feel extremely old but I’ve done it.”

Due to falling sick just hours before the team was due to play at Lord’s Cricket Ground, Warne missed the London Spirit match, with the team going on to lose against Southern Brave.

“London Spirit men’s head coach Shane Warne will be absent from (Sunday)’s match against Southern Brave at Lord’s,” the club said in a statement.

“After feeling unwell (Sunday) morning, Shane returned a positive lateral flow test and will isolate from the squad and support staff whilst he awaits PCR results.

“A second member of the team management is self-isolating after also returning a positive test. No players have been impacted.”

The team took to Instagram to wish Warne well.

Shane Warne's team wishing him well.

Shane Warne’s team wishing him well.

Warne returned to the UK recently to coach the London team and praised the nation for “learning to live” with coronavirus.

“I’ve been here for a few weeks and the country just opened up and they’re having 50,000 odd cases a day but they’re learning to live with it,” Warne told Sky News Australia last week.

“It’s been really interesting to watch how they’ve done it … it’s a very interesting time over here and watching how it all works.

“I think it’s just a matter of getting on with it, get you double vax and get on and learn to live with it.

“No one over here wants to be locked down down anymore … it’s been so tough, I think they’ve just said enough’s enough.”

David Ripley, the Northamptonshire head coach and one of Spirit’s assistants, acted as head coach in Warne’s absence.

Warne is the second coach in the UK’s inaugural Hundred cricket competition to test positive.