North Korea has criticised Australia for supporting America’s tough stance on Pyongyang and says if it continues to do so, a disaster will happen.

Key points:

  • North Korea says Julie Bishop has expressed support for the US’ stance against Pyongyang
  • It accused Australia of “zealously joining the frenzied political and military provocations of the US”
  • Ms Bishop effectively ruled out sending an Australian delegation to the rogue state

In a statement on the state-run news agency, North Korea accused Australia of “dangerous moves” by joining what it calls the frenzied political and military provocations of the US.

It said Foreign Minister Julie Bishop had personally expressed her support for the US’ stance to consider all options including the use of force towards Pyongyang.

“Lately, Australia is showing dangerous moves of zealously joining the frenzied political and military provocations of the US against the DPRK,” the statement says.

“The Australian Foreign Minister personally expressed her support for the stand of the US to consider all options including the use of force towards the DPRK.

“And [Ms Bishop] turned up at Panmunjom on October 11 together with the Australian Defence Minister to condemn the DPRK during her visit to South Korea,” referring to Ms Bishop’s visit to the border between the two Koreas.

In its warning, the North Korean Foreign Ministry statement said Australia would not be able to avoid disaster if it continued to align itself with the US and South Korea.

Ms Bishop last week said she had real concerns North Korea might launch another missile test to coincide with a meeting of China’s Communist Party Congress.

Julie Bishop and Defense Minister Marise Payne answer reporters' questions.
PHOTO: Julie Bishop (right) and Defense Minister Marise Payne visit inter-Korean truce village of Panmunjom. (AAP: Yonhap News Agency)

“I believe that the United States is rather advanced in its back channelling with North Korea,” Ms Bishop said.

She dismissed suggestions Australia’s embassy in Pyongyang, which has been closed since 1974, could be reopened.

“We work with other countries who do have a presence in Pyongyang, but I believe they have limited success in engaging with the regime,” she said.

Ms Bishop met her South Korean counterpart last week to address Pyongyang’s pursuit of its nuclear and missile programs.

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has said the global community needs to maintain economic pressure on North Korea.