elevation worship

30 June 2019 Lance Goodall

 

 

If you are across Christian Albums that are produced bi-annually you may remember last year the release of the album by Hillsong called — There is More.

 

I dealt at length regarding some of the symbols

 

Now Elevation Church rather than being original have taken these same symbols and plastered them across their latest album — Paradoxology.

 

These strange and flagrant Roman Catholic motifs show just how far this churches of modernity have strayed backwards into a spirit of anti-Christ and the pagan idolatry which has infiltrated these churches artistic department, (and the church),  and is a sign of things to come!

 

Elevation Worship has surprised fans with the release of their new album Paradoxology in April this year. the collection features 8 songs from their most recent Grammy-nominated album, Hallelujah Here Below, reimagined, plus a brand new song “With You.”

Worship leader Chris Brown explains: “A couple of days after we released our last album, ‘Hallelujah Here Below,’ Pastor Steven Furtick asked me ‘what next?’ Typical! We thought it’d be fun to get in the studio with our team and reimagine some of the songs from that album and record a new one (“With You”). And so we did – Reimagine! And it was – FUN! And today we’re releasing ‘Paradoxology.’ Really hope these songs bless you. Listen wherever you buy or stream music!”⁣

 

Elevation Worship is the worship ministry of Elevation Church, a multisite church based in Charlotte, NC, led by Pastor Steven Furtick. Their previous album, Hallelujah Here Below, released in September of 2018 and has been nominated for Best Contemporary Christian Album of the Year at the 61st Grammy Awards being held in February of 2019.

Their album There Is A Cloud featured the current Christian radio top-5 song “Do It Again.” After finishing the fall leg of their Hallelujah Here Below Tour in 2018, they will be continuing their tour with Leeland in January and Cody Carnes in March. They have previously toured with other prominent bands such as Hillsong Worship, Bethel Music, Kari Jobe, Jesus Culture, and Lauren Daigle.

The Winged Bull

This well known symbol is an ancient Assyrian reference to the Nimrod himself.

 

Winged Bull from Nimrud | ClipArt ETC

 

[From The Two Babylons]

When thus we find a custom that is clearly founded on a form of speech that characteristically distinguished the region where Nimrod’s power was wielded, used in so many different countries far removed from one another, where no such form of speech was used in ordinary life, we may be sure that such a custom was not the result of mere accident, but that it indicates the wide-spread diffusion of an influence that went forth in all directions from Babylon, from the time that Nimrod first “began to be mighty on the earth.”

There was another way in which Nimrod’s power was symbolised besides by the “horn.”

A synonym for Gheber, “The mighty one,” was “Abir,” while “Aber” also signified a “wing.”

Nimrod, as Head and Captain of those men of war, by whom he surrounded himself, and who were the instruments of establishing his power, was “Baal-aberin,” “Lord of the mighty ones.”

But “Baal-abirin” (pronounced nearly in the same way) signified “The winged one,” + and therefore in symbol he was represented, not only as a horned bull, but as at once a horned and winged bull–as showing not merely that he was mighty himself, but that he had mighty ones under his command, who were ever ready to carry his will into effect, and to put down all opposition to his power; and to shadow forth the vast extent of his might, he was represented with great and wide-expanding wings. +

This is according to a peculiar Oriental idiom, of which there are many examples. Thus, Baal-aph, “lord of wrath,” signifies “an angry man”; Baal-lashon, “lord of tongue,” “an eloquent man”; Baal-hatsim, “lord of arrows,” “an archer”; and in like manner, Baal-aberin, “lord of wings,” signifies “winged one.”

To this mode of representing the mighty kings of Babylon and Assyria, who imitated Nimrod and his successors, there is manifest allusion in Isaiah 8: 6-8 “Forasmuch as this people refuseth the waters of Shiloah that go softly, and rejoice in Rezin and Remaliah’s son; now therefore, behold, the Lord bringeth up upon them the waters of the river, strong and mighty, even the king of Assyria, and all his glory; and he shall come up over all his banks. And he shall pass through Judah; he shall overflow and go over; he shall reach even unto the neck; and the STRETCHING OUT OF HIS WINGS shall FILL the breadth of thy land, O Immanuel.”

When we look at such figures, with their great extent of expanded wing, as symbolising an Assyrian king, what a vividness and force does it give to the inspired language of the prophet! And how clear is it, also, that the stretching forth of the Assyrian monarch’s WINGS, that was to “fill the breadth of Immanuel’s land,” has that very symbolic meaning to which I have referred–viz., the overspreading of the land by his “mighty ones,” or hosts of armed men, that the king of Babylon was to bring with him in his overflowing invasion! The knowledge of the way in which the Assyrian monarchs were represented, and of the meaning of that representation, gives additional force to the story of the dream of Cyrus the Great, as told by Herodotus.

Cyrus, says the historian, dreamt that he saw the son of one of his princes, who was at the time in a distant province, with two great “wings on his shoulders, the one of which overshadowed Asia, and the other Europe,” from which he immediately concluded that he was organising rebellion against him.

 

 

The symbols of the Babylonians, whose capital Cyrus had taken, and to whose power he had succeeded, were entirely familiar to him; and if the “wings” were the symbols of sovereign power, and the possession of them implied the lordship over the might, or the armies of the empire, it is easy to see how very naturally any suspicions of disloyalty affecting the individual in question might take shape in the manner related, in the dreams of him who might harbour these suspicions.

Now, the understanding of this equivocal sense of “Baal-aberin” can alone explain the remarkable statement of Aristophanes, that at the beginning of the world “the birds” were first created, and then after their creation, came the “race of the blessed immortal gods.” This has been regarded as either an atheistical or nonsensical utterance on the part of the poet, but, with the true key applied to the language, it is found to contain an important historical fact.

Let it only be borne in mind that “the birds”–that is, the “winged ones”–symbolised “the Lords of the mighty ones,” and then the meaning is clear, viz., that men first “began to be mighty on the earth”; and then, that the “Lords” or Leaders of “these mighty ones” were deified.

The knowledge of the mystic sense of this symbol accounts also for the origin of the story of Perseus, the son of Jupiter, miraculously born of Danae, who did such wondrous things, and who passed from country to country on wings divinely bestowed on him. This equally casts light on the symbolic myths in regard to Bellerophon, and the feats which he performed on his winged horse, and their ultimate disastrous issue; how high he mounted in the air, and how terrible was his fall; and of Icarus, the son of Daedalus, who, flying on wax-cemented wings over the Icarian Sea, had his wings melted off through his too near approach to the sun, and so gave his name to the sea where he was supposed to have fallen.

The fables all referred to those who trode, or were supposed to have trodden, in the steps of Nimrod, the first “Lord of the mighty ones,” and who in that character was symbolised as equipped with wings.

Now, it is remarkable that, in the passage of Aristophanes already referred to, that speaks of the birds, or “the winged ones,” being produced before the gods, we are informed that he from whom both “mighty ones” and gods derived their origin, was none other than the winged boy Cupid. +

The Phoenix

The phoenix bird symbolises rebirth, especially of the sun, and has variants in European, Central American, Egyptian, and Asian cultures.5

Even Chris Tomlin uses it in one of his songs called ‘Our God’.6

Search any song title on the phoenix, and there is this explicit reference to the phoenix rising from ashes or out of the flames. How can Christians not know this?

In the 19th century, Danish author Hans Christian Andersen wrote a story about the phoenix. Edith Nesbit features a phoenix in one of her children’s stories, The Phoenix and the Carpet, as does J. K. Rowling in the infamous Harry Potter series. In one volume of Harry Potter, the phoenix does its usual resurrecting routine. J. K. Rowling wrote Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix in 2003.

According to Egyptian sources, a sacred bird was occasionally seen at the temple in Heliopolis, the city of the sun god. On some of the oldest and best pictures, the bird resembles a heron. The bird symbolised the rising sun, i.e. the day and eternal rebirth. According to an Egyptian myth, Osiris transformed into a phoenix in Heliopolis.

The bird was from time to time depicted sitting in a tree next to Osiris’s coffin, thus symbolising Osiris’s death, and resurrection.

The myth spread and has lasted until today. Catholic monks in the Middle Ages employed the phoenix as a symbol of Christ because of its voluntary death and rebirth.7

A new phoenix always rises from the ashes.8

Manly P Hall, in his book entitled The Secret Destiny of America (1958, p. 176,177) wrote:

‘All symbols have their origin in something tangible, and the phoenix is one sign of the secret orders of the ancient world, and of the initiate of those orders, for it was common to refer to one who had been accepted into temples as a man twice-born, or reborn. Wisdom confers a new life, and those who become wise are born again.’ Hall was referring to the illumination through the phoenix.

A former witch had this to say regarding the occult belief in the phoenix bird: ‘The Phoenix . . . is believed to be a divine bird going back to Egypt. . . . This Phoenix destroys itself in flames and then rises from the ashes. Most occultists believe that the Phoenix is a symbol of Luciferwho was cast down in flames and who they think will one day rise triumphant. This, of course, also relates to the rising Hiram Abiff, the Masonic “Christ”’(C. Burns, Masonic and Occult Symbols Illustrated, p. 123).

Thus, what we have here is a bird, the occult phoenix bird that has its roots in ancient mythology. This mythical bird symbolises the new age concept of being born again.9

The Sacred Heart:

[Adapted from The Two Babylons by Alexander Hislop]

In the Church of Rome a new kind of devotion has of late been largely introduced, in which the beads play an important part, and which shows what new and additional strides in the direction of the old Babylonian Paganism the Papacy every day is steadily making.

I refer to the “Rosary of the Sacred Heart.”

It is not very long since the worship of the “Sacred Heart” was first introduced; and now, everywhere it is the favourite worship.

It was so in ancient Babylon, as is evident from the Babylonian system as it appeared in Egypt.

There also a “Sacred Heart” was venerated.

 

The “Heart” was one of the sacred symbols of Osiris when he was born again, and appeared as Harpocrates, or the infant divinity, + borne in the arms of his mother Isis. + The name Harpocrates,as shown by Bunsen, signifies “Horus, the child.”

 

Harpocrates was the Greek and Roman God of Silence, adapted from the Egyptian Har-pa-khered in the Hellenistic period.  He was the child version of Horus, the newborn sun, depicted in statues as a child with a finger to his mouth.  This, representing a child, was misinterpreted by Greeks as meaning silence.

Horus

In Egyptian mythologyHorus was the child of Isis and Osiris. Osiris was the original divine pharaoh of Egypt, who had been murdered by his brother Set, mummified, and thus became the god of the underworld.

The Greeks melded Osiris with their underworldly Hades to produce the essentially Alexandrian syncretism known as Serapis.

Among the Egyptians, the full-grown Horus was considered the victorious god of the sun who each day overcomes darkness. He is often represented with the head of a Eurasian sparrowhawk, which was sacred to him, as the hawk flies high above the Earth. Horus fought battles against Set, until he finally achieved victory and became the ruler of Egypt. Thereafter, the pharaohs of Egypt were seen as reincarnations of the victorious Horus.

The fruit of the Egyptian Persea was peculiarly sacred to him, from its resemblance to the “HUMAN HEART.”

Hence this infant divinity was frequently represented with a heart, or the heart-shaped fruit of the Persea, in one of his hands. The following extract, from John Bell’s criticism on the antiques in the Picture Gallery of Florence, will show that the boyish divinity had been represented elsewhere also in ancient times in the same manner.

elevation worship

Kennett tells us, in his Antiquities, that the Roman youths, in their tender years, used to wear a golden ornament suspended from their necks, called bulla, which was hollow, and heart-shaped.

Barker, in his work on Cilicia, while admitting that the Roman bulla was heart-shaped, further states, that “it was usual at the birth of a child to name it after some divine personage, who was supposed to receive it under his care”; but that the “name was not retained beyond infancy, when the bulla was given up.”

 

Speaking of a statue of Cupid, he says it is “a fair, full, fleshy, round boy, in fine and sportive action, tossing back a heart.”

Thus the boy-god came to be regarded as the “god of the heart,” in other words, as Cupid, or the god of love.

To identify this infant divinity, with his father “the mighty hunter,” he was equipped with “bow and arrows”; and in the hands of the poets, for the amusement of the profane vulgar, this sportive boy-god was celebrated as taking aim with his gold-tipped shafts at the hearts of mankind.

 

His real character, however, as the above statement shows, and as we have seen reason already to conclude, was far higher and of a very different kind. He was the woman’s seed.

Venus and her son Cupid, then, were none other than the Madonna and the child.

As the boy-god, whose symbol was the heart, was recognised as the god of childhood, this very satisfactorily accounts for one of the peculiar customs of the Romans.

The veneration of the “sacred heart” seems also to have extended to India, for there Vishnu, the Mediatorial god, in one of his forms, with the mark of the wound in his foot, in consequence of which he died, and for which such lamentation is annually made, is represented as wearing a heart suspended on his breast.

It is asked, How came it that the “Heart” became the recognised symbol of the Child of the great Mother? In other words the child was symbolised by a heart.

The answer is, “The Heart” in Chaldee is “BEL”; and as, at first, after the check given to idolatry, almost all the most important elements of the Chaldean system were introduced under a veil, so under that veil they continued to be shrouded from the gaze of the uninitiated, after the first reason–the reason of fear–had long ceased to operate.

Now, the worship of the “Sacred Heart” was just, under a symbol, the worship of the “Sacred Bel,” that mighty one of Babylon, who had died a martyr for idolatry; for Harpocrates, or Horus, the infant god, was regarded as Bel, born again. 

That this was in very deed the case, the following extract from Taylor, in one of his notes to his translation of the Orphic Hymns, will show. “While Bacchus,” says he, was “beholding himself” with admiration “in a mirror, he was miserably torn to pieces by the Titans, who, not content with this cruelty, first boiled his members in water, and afterwards roasted them in the fire; but while they were tasting his flesh thus dressed, Jupiter, excited by the steam, and perceiving the cruelty of the deed, hurled his thunder at the Titans, but committed his members to Apollo, the brother of Bacchus, that they might be properly interred. And this being performed, Dionysius , (whose HEART, during his laceration, was snatched away by Minerva and preserved) by a new REGENERATION, again emerged, and he being restored to his pristine life and integrity, afterwards filled up the number of the gods.”

This surely shows, in a striking light, the peculiar sacredness of the heart of Bacchus; and that the regeneration of his heart has the very meaning I have attached to it–viz., the new birth or new incarnation of Nimrod or Bel. When Bel, however was born again as a child, he was, as we have seen, represented as an incarnation of the sun.

Therefore, to indicate his connection with the fiery and burning sun, the “sacred heart” was frequently represented as a “heart of flame.”

 

So the “Sacred Heart” of Rome is actually worshipped as a flaming heart, as may be seen on the rosaries devoted to that worship. Of what use, then, is it to say that the “Sacred Heart” which Rome worships is called by the name of “Jesus,” when not only is the devotion given to a material image borrowed from the worship of the Babylonian Antichrist, but when the attributes ascribed to that “Jesus” are not the attributes of the living and loving Saviour, but the genuine attributes of the ancient Moloch or Bel?

The use of Jesus’ heart to symbolize his love for humanity is not found in the Bible but in the writings of some medieval mystics.

The devotion was fostered by Carthusian and Jesuit priests and promoted by St. Francis de Sales.

The devotion became especially popular following the disclosure of private revelations to a French Visitandine nun, St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, in the late 17th century. Assisted by Claude de la Colombière, her confessor, she called for the establishment of a feast in honour of the Sacred Heart and for prayers of reparation for sins, especially for those directed against the Eucharist. In 1856 Pope Pius IX introduced the feast into the general calendar of the Roman Catholic Church.

The Stairway to Heaven

 

                                               Scala Sancta – the Holy Stairs in Rome

 

Over the centuries, pilgrims wishing to honour Christ’s passion have climbed the steps on their knees; some have hoped that through doing so they would acquire plenary indulgence (a plenary indulgence removes all the temporal punishment for sin).

Luther had supposedly climbed the stairs on his knees in the hope of being relieved of his burden in seeking assurance of God’s mercy and forgiveness.

In the religion of Freemasonry there is a strong relationship to stairs

Hence there is in Speculative Masonry always a progress, symbolised by its peculiar ceremonies of initiation. There is an advancement from a lower to a higher state–from darkness to light–from death to life–from error to truth.

The candidate is always ascending; he is never stationary; he never goes back, but each step he takes brings him to some new mental illumination–to the knowledge of some more elevated doctrine.

The teaching of the Divine Master is, in respect to this continual progress, the teaching of Masonry–“No man having put his hand to the plough, and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of heaven.” And similar to this is the precept of Pythagoras: “When travelling, turn not back, for if you do the Furies will accompany you.”

Now, this principle of masonic symbolism is apparent in many places in each of the degrees.

In that of the Entered Apprentice we find it developed in the theological ladder, which, resting on earth, leans its top upon heaven, thus inculcating the idea of an ascent from a lower to a higher sphere, as the object of masonic labour. In the Master’s degree we find it exhibited in its most religious form, in the restoration from death to life–in the change from the obscurity of the grave to the holy of holies of the Divine Presence. In all the degrees we find it presented in the ceremony of circumambulation, in which there is a gradual inquisition, and a passage from an inferior to a superior officer.

Still must he go onward and forward. The stair is still before him; its summit is not yet reached, and still further treasures of wisdom are to be sought for, or the reward will not be gained, nor the middle chamber, the abiding place of truth, be reached.

The lessons which he receives are simply intended to cleanse the heart and prepare the recipient for that mental illumination which is to be given in the succeeding degrees.

This is nothing but works based religion!

 

The All Seeing Eye

 

[The sun-god (Baal, Tammuz, Ra / Horus) was worshipped in ancient times. It was sometimes depicted with one eye (the all-seeing-eye).] 

The Eternal Flame

What do the flames, light, arrows, and crown of thorns mean?

The Sacred Heart is among the most familiar and moving of Catholic devotional images. But its symbolism can also be strange. As we mark the Feast of the Sacred Heart early this month, here is a look at the explanation behind some of the features of the Sacred Heart.The flames. 

The following is the way a Roman Catholic connects all the dots of this strange symbolism but why is this on the cover of Evangelical Charismatic worship music albums?

The Sacred Heart most obviously brings to mind the Passion of Christ on the cross. There is the crown of thorns, the cross, usually atop the heart, and the wound from the spear that pierced His side. But why is the Sacred Heart always shown as if it’s on fire? That certainly did not happen at the crucifixion.

Explaining the strange symbolism of the Sacred Heart

There are three reasons behind this.

 

First, we have to remember that Christ’s self-offering on the cross was the one-time perfect consummation of all the sacrifices of the Old Testament. This necessarily includes burnt offerings, which were the highest form of sacrifices in ancient Israel, according to The Jewish Encyclopedia. An early form of such sacrifices was what Abraham set out to do with Isaac, hence the wood he had his son collect beforehand.

 

Second, fire is always associated with the essence of divinity in the Old Testament. Think back to the burning bush that spoke to Moses, the cloud of fire that settled on Sinai, and the flames from above that consumed the sacrifice of Elijah. This explanation fits with the gospel account of the crucifixion, in which the piercing of Christ’s side revealed His heart at the same time that the curtain of the temple was torn, unveiling the holy of holies where God was present.

Lastly, the image of fire associated with heart represents Christ’s passionate love for us. One 19th-century French devotional card has these words arched above the Sacred Heart—Voilà ce Cœur qui a tant aimé les hommes, which roughly translates to: “Here is the heart that loved men so much.” One traditional exclamation is, “Sacred Heart of Jesus, burning with love of us, inflame our hearts with love of Thee.” We see this actually happen in the gospels, where the disciples on the road to Emmaus realized that their hearts had been “burning” after their encounter with Jesus. (I’ve also previously written about the Sacred Heart and fire here.)

The rays of light. Look closer at the image of the Sacred Heart. There is something else framing it besides the flames. They are rays of light. In John 8:12, Christ declares that He is the “light of the world.” In Revelation 21:23, we are told that in the new Jerusalem at the end of times there will be no light from the sun or moon because the Lamb of God—that is, Jesus—will be its source of light. Light, like fire, is a symbol of divinity. Think of the Transfiguration and the blinding light that Paul experienced on the road to Damascus. As the light of the world, Christ is also the one who “enlightens” us, revealing God to us. The Sacred Heart constitutes the climax of divine self-revelation, showing us the depths of God’s love for us. (See also this source here, especially for other associations with light.)

The Arrows. The crown of thorns and the spear make sense. But sometimes the Sacred Heart is also depicted with arrows. Again, that’s not something we find in the gospels. One explanation is that the arrow represents sin. This is reportedly what our Lord Himself said in a private revelation to St. Mary of St. Peter. (See here for more.) The arrow could also draw upon an ancient Roman metaphor for love, which, according to ancient myth, occurred when the god Cupid shot an arrow through the hearts of lovers (as this author points out).

The Crown of Thorns. Unlike the arrows, the crown of thorns is reported in the gospels. But in traditional images it encircles the Sacred Heart, whereas in Scripture the crown was fixed to Jesus’ head. One traditional account offers this interpretation, describing those who are devoted to it: “They saw the crown transferred from His head to His heart; they felt that its sharp points had always pierced there; they understood that the Passion was the crucifixion of a heart” (The Heart of the Gospel: Traits of the Sacred Heart by Francis Patrick Donnelly, published in 1911 by the Apostleship of Prayer). In other words, wrapping the crown around the heart emphasizes the fact that Christ felt His wounds to the depths of His heart.

Moreover, after the resurrection, the crown of thorns becomes a crown of victory. Donnelly hints at this as well: “From the weapons of His enemy, from cross and crown and opened Heart, our conquering leader fashioned a trophy which was the best testimony of His love.” In ancient gladiatorial contests, the victor was crowned. In the Revelation 19:12, Christ wears “many crowns” and believers who are victorious over sin and Satan will receive the “crown of life” (Revelation 2:10).

Finally, according to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, the seventeenth French nun who helped start the devotion, the points of the thorns are the many individual sins of people, pricking the heart of Jesus. As she put it in a letter, recounting the personal vision she had received, “I saw this divine Heart as on a throne of flames, more brilliant than the sun and transparent as crystal. It had Its adorable wound and was encircled with a crown of thorns, which signified the pricks our sins caused Him.”

The Cross. Like the thorns, the cross is both rooted in the gospels but also displayed in a way that does not follow them in every detail. There is almost an inversion of the crucifixion. In the gospels, Christ hung on the cross, His heart correspondingly dwarfed by its beams. But in images of the Sacred Heart, it is now enlarged and the cross has shrunk. Moreover, rather than the heart being nailed to the cross, the cross now seems ‘planted’ in the heart—as St. Margaret Mary Alacoque put it—if to say to us that the entire reality of the crucifixion derives its meaning from and—cannot be understood apart from—the heart of Jesus. As Donnelly wrote, “The Heart [is] … forever supporting the weight of a Cross.”

All of this symbolism is nothing more than Christianized Babylonian worship!

The Hands 

What does Hamsa mean? Hand of Fatima or Hamsa

Celebrity with hamsa necklace

Hamsa is a talismanic symbol that people believed to protect them from harm against the evil forces.

The Hamsa Hand or Hand of Fatima is an ancient Middle Eastern talisman. In all religions it is a protective symbol. It is talismanic symbol that people believed to protect them  from harm against the evil eye and bring them goodness, abundance, fertility, luck and good health.

Many early cultures adopted the eye as an icon for their protection, others used Hamsa and so over time the most popular universal symbol became an eye placed in the palm of a hand. Hamsa hand bracelet or hand of fatima necklace is worn by people who have the faith in a “Supreme Power” and find themselves at a cross-road in life.

They could follow different religions; some of them could be Jewish, Muslim others could be advocates of Christianity or Buddhism. Irrespective of their religious beliefs, they would find themselves in a common ground as far as having faith in a Higher Power is concerned.

The amulet consists of five spread fingers, often with an eye on the hand. It can be found today throughout the Middle East in women’s jewelry, as hamsa bracelet , hamsa necklace , hand of fatima pendant , flat-weaving, embroidery, door-knockers, automobile ornamentation, and so on.

They would want to depend on this energy source to keep themselves protected from negative influences that are otherwise outside their control. Hamsa hand or Hand of Fatima can now be found as an attractive symbol in people’s homes or may even be worn by them as ornaments. Many people still place it in their homes where the guests can see in the moment they enter. As there is a widespread belief that it will protect the house and household from disasters primarily fire.

 

Hamsa Necklace

The hamsa hand has a wide variety of different spellings which includes hamesh, hamsa, chamsa, and khamsa.  It is also identified as the Hand of Miriam, Aaron and Moses’s sister, and the Hand of Fatima. The wearer of the hamsa hand can wear it facing up or down and it is believed to give the owner success, harmony, and protection from the evil eye or nazar.

The word, “hamsa,” derives its name from the five fingers on the hand. In Hebrew, the number five is “hamesh” and the fifth letter of the Hebrew alphabet is “Hey,” one of God’s holy names. “Hamesh” is representative of the five books of the Torah. In Judaism, it is also interpreted to be the Hand of Miriam, and symbolic of the owner’s five senses in an effort to praise God.

In Arabic, it is “khamesh.” In the Sunni culture, the hamsa is associated with the Five Pillars of Islam.  For the Shi’tes, it symbolizes the Five People of the Cloak.  In the Islamic faith, it symbolizes as The Hand of Fatima, the daughter of the Prophet Mohammed.

What is the meaning of Hamsa Hand or The Hand of Fatima Amulets with Evil Eye Symbol ?

A blue eye can also be found on some forms of the hamsa hand jewelry, an apotropaic hand-shaped amulet against the evil eye found in the Middle East.

The word hamsa, also spelled khamsa and hamesh, means five referring to the fingers of the hand. In Jewish culture, the hamsa is called the Hand of Miriam; in Muslim culture, the Hand of Fatima. The Fatima amulet is called a Khamsa in Muslim world, from the Arabic word for five, and is seen as protection against the evil eye. The amulet consists of five spread fingers, often with an eye on the hand. It can be found today throughout the Middle East in women’s jewelry, as hamsa bracelet , hamsa necklace , hand of fatima pendant , flat-weaving, embroidery, door-knockers, automobile ornamentation, and so on.

According to the Native American version, a person who stares fixedly at a pregnant woman or a child or who is too admiring or physically affectionate with children may produce a malicious effect on their lives, whether or not by intent. 

This belief may have arisen because people from cultures not used to the evil eye, such as Northern Europe, are likely to transgress local customs against staring or praising the beauty of children.

Thus, in Greece and Turkey amulets against the evil eye take the form of blue eyes. The Turkish talisman Known as nazar is most frequently seen in Turkey, found in or on houses and vehicles or worn as beads. A blue or green eye can also be found on some forms of the hamsa hand, an apotropaic hand-shaped talisman against the evil eye found in West Asia. The word hamsa, also spelled khamsa and hamesh, means “five” referring to the fingers of the hand. In Jewish culture, the hamsa is called the Hand of Miriam; in some Muslim cultures, the Hand of Fatima. Though condemned as superstition by doctrinaire Muslims, it is almost exclusively among Muslims in the Near East and Mediterranean that the belief in envious looks containing destructive power or the talismanic power of a nazar to defend against them.

Adopted by many sects such as Muslims,Christians and Jews. The image of the open right hand is seen in Mesopotamian artifacts of teaching and protection. Other symbols of divine protection based around the hand include the Hand-of-Venus (or Aphrodite) and the Hand-of-Mary that was used to protect women from the evil eye, boost fertility and lactation, promote healthy pregnancies, and strengthen the weak.

Which way up should the Hamsa hand be?

Hand Facing Down
When the Hamsa hand faces down, it opens you up to all of the abundance and goodness of the universe, welcoming them into your life. Hand facing down also brings fertility and answers to prayers and manifestations. Often, in this position, the fingers are closed together to bring good luck.

Hand Facing Up
When the Hamsa hand is facing up, it is a universal sign against evil. It is a powerful sign of protection, and shields us from our inner thoughts of hatred, jealousy and insecurities. Often, in this position, the fingers are spread apart to ward off evil.

 

elevation worship
Conclusion:
All these symbols are tied into the worship of the false Christ, with false light, false salvation, and false regeneration, which finds it revival within the Roman Catholicism, but which finds its origin in the ancient Babylonian religion. 

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