Image: Moderna’s CEO, CMO both sell shares as final coronavirus vaccine trials begin… what do they know that we don’t?

Selling Their Shares… what do they know that we don’t?

(Natural News) The executive leadership over at Moderna is abandoning ship in terms of what the future holds for its Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine.

Both Stéphane Bancel, its CEO, and Tal Zaks, its CMO (chief medical officer) have cashed out their company shares as the company’s plandemic jab is right on the verge of entering late-stage trials.

According to Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings, Zaks recently offloaded nearly all of his shares, while Bancel has tossed many of his over the past several months. Zaks, however, still holds tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of options in the company.

If Moderna’s vaccine for the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) was on a solid track, both of these guys probably would have kept their shares, and possibly purchased even more of them. The fact that they cashed out, however, bodes ominous, especially for other shareholders still holding the bag.

Zaks also works on the scientific side of the company, it is important to note, suggesting that he knows something that the rest of the world does not. Is Moderna’s vaccine on the verge of being exposed as a total failure, we wonder?

It was already obvious before this that Moderna’s jab was just a pump-and-dump scheme anyway. And now it would seem that the scam is on the verge of unraveling.

“In general, when stakeholders believe in their product, they increase their shares in order to increase confidence in the market,” reports The Jerusalem Post.

“The move by Moderna officials to do the opposite raised concerns about the company, especially considering that Zaks, who sold almost all of his shares, is on the scientific side of the company, according to Globes.”

Don’t be fooled: Moderna has probably got nothing

While Moderna would never publicly admit to it, chances are that its Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine is a total dud.

And yet the company has continued to increase share sales ever since the results of “successful” early trials were reported back in early July.

Though these results appear to be questionable at best, Moderna has continued to sell shares to eager investors that are being hoodwinked into believing that the company’s Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) jab holds promise.

Meanwhile, Bancel, his children’s trust, as well as other companies that Bancel owns all offloaded about $21 million worth of shares between January 1 and June 26.

Reuters reportedly spoke with seven different executive compensation experts about these mysterious share liquidations, which they explained highlight how companies will hype up development milestones for their products, even if said products never actually make it to market.

In other words, Moderna’s Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine may never be released, despite the company receiving gobs of American taxpayer cash to develop one. At the same time, its executives are getting filthy rich off of the mere idea of a future vaccine being released.

“This may be their one shot at making a boatload of money if the vaccine doesn’t work out,” says Jesse Fried, a Harvard Law School professor who wrote an entire book about executive compensation. According to Fried, Moderna’s chiefs have a strong incentive to “keep the stock price up.”

Investors, however, may not fully understand this, despite considering themselves “savvy.” Many are right this moment buying up what appear to be overpriced shares in Moderna, which may never end up releasing this “promising” vaccine at all.

“The trial is one of the first late-stage studies supported by the Trump administration’s effort to speed development of measures against the novel coronavirus, adding to hope that an effective vaccine will help end the pandemic,” the Post further reports about Moderna’s progress.

More of the latest news about the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) is available at Pandemic.news.

Sources for this article include:

JPost.com

NaturalNews.com