Rabbi Mendel Kessin gives a deeper Torah perspective on the 2016 elections and what it means for America, the world and the Jewish people.

You will notice the Rabbi makes a number of references to the term mashiach, or “Messiah” that’s if I’m not mistaken.

So Trump and the republicans according to the Rabbi, are ushering in the time of the Messiah….interesting!?

Background is from wikipedia

In Jewish eschatology, the term mashiach, or “Messiah”, came to refer to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line, who is expected to be anointed with holy anointing oil and rule the Jewish people during the Messianic Age.[1][2][3] The Messiah is often referred to as “King Messiah”, or, in Hebrew, מלך משיח (melekh mashiach), and, in Aramaic, malka meshiḥa.[4]

Orthodox views have generally held that the Messiah will be descended from his father through the line of King David,[5] and will gather the Jews back into the Land of Israel, usher in an era of peace, build the Third Temple, father a male heir, re-institute the Sanhedrin, and so on. Jewish tradition alludes to two redeemers, both of whom are calledmashiach and are involved in ushering in the Messianic age: Mashiach ben David; and Mashiach ben Yosef. In general, the term Messiah unqualified refers to Mashiach ben David (Messiah, son of David).[1][2]

Talmud

The Talmud extensively discusses the coming of the Messiah (Sanhedrin 98a–99a, et al.) and describes a period of freedom and peace, which will be the time of ultimate goodness for the Jews.

Tractate Sanhedrin contains a long discussion of the events leading to the coming of the Messiah, for example:

R. Johanan said: When you see a generation ever dwindling, hope for him [the Messiah], as it is written, “And the afflicted people thou wilt save.”[II Samuel 22:28] R. Johanan said: When thou seest a generation overwhelmed by many troubles as by a river, await him, as it is written, “When the enemy shall come in like a flood, the Spirit of the Lord shall lift up a standard against him;” which is followed by, “And the Redeemer shall come to Zion.”

R. Johanan also said: The son of David will come only in a generation that is either altogether righteous or altogether wicked. in a generation that is altogether righteous, — as it is written, “Thy people also shall be all righteous: they shall inherit the land for ever.” Or altogether wicked, — as it is written, “And he saw that there was no man, and wondered that there was no intercessor;” and it is [elsewhere] written, “For mine own sake, even for mine own sake, will I do it.”[6]

The Talmud tells many stories about the Messiah, some of which represent famous Talmudic rabbis as receiving personal visitations from Elijah the Prophet and the Messiah. For example:

R. Joshua b. Levi met Elijah standing by the entrance of R. Simeon b. Yohai’s tomb. He asked him: “Have I a portion in the world to come?” He replied, “if this Master desires it.” R. Joshua b. Levi said, “I saw two, but heard the voice of a third.” He then asked him, “When will the Messiah come?” — “Go and ask him himself,” was his reply. “Where is he sitting?” — “At the entrance.” “And by what sign may I recognise him?” — “He is sitting among the poor lepers: all of them untie [them] all at once, and rebandage them together, whereas he unties and rebandages each separately, [before treating the next], thinking, should I be wanted, [it being time for my appearance as the Messiah] I must not be delayed [through having to bandage a number of sores].” So he went to him and greeted him, saying, “Peace upon thee, Master and Teacher.” “Peace upon thee, O son of Levi,” he replied. “When wilt thou come, Master?” asked he. “Today,” was his answer. On his returning to Elijah, the latter enquired, “What did he say to thee?” — “peace Upon thee, O son of Levi,” he answered. Thereupon he [Elijah] observed, “He thereby assured thee and thy father of [a portion in] the world to come.” “He spoke falsely to me,” he rejoined, “stating that he would come today, but has not.” He [Elijah] answered him, “This is what he said to thee, To-day, if ye will listen to his voice.”[6]

In Jewish eschatology, the term mashiach, or “Messiah”, came to refer to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line, who is expected to be anointed with holy anointing oil and rule the Jewish people during the Messianic Age.[1][2][3] The Messiah is often referred to as “King Messiah”, or, in Hebrew, מלך משיח (melekh mashiach), and, in Aramaic, malka meshiḥa.[4]

Orthodox views have generally held that the Messiah will be descended from his father through the line of King David,[5] and will gather the Jews back into the Land of Israel, usher in an era of peace, build the Third Temple, father a male heir, re-institute the Sanhedrin, and so on. Jewish tradition alludes to two redeemers, both of whom are called mashiach and are involved in ushering in the Messianic age: Mashiach ben David; and Mashiach ben Yosef. In general, the term Messiah unqualified refers to Mashiach ben David (Messiah, son of David).[1][2]

Talmud[edit]
The Talmud extensively discusses the coming of the Messiah (Sanhedrin 98a–99a, et al.) and describes a period of freedom and peace, which will be the time of ultimate goodness for the Jews.

Tractate Sanhedrin contains a long discussion of the events leading to the coming of the Messiah, for example:

R. Johanan said: When you see a generation ever dwindling, hope for him [the Messiah], as it is written, “And the afflicted people thou wilt save.”[II Samuel 22:28] R. Johanan said: When thou seest a generation overwhelmed by many troubles as by a river, await him, as it is written, “When the enemy shall come in like a flood, the Spirit of the Lord shall lift up a standard against him;” which is followed by, “And the Redeemer shall come to Zion.”

R. Johanan also said: The son of David will come only in a generation that is either altogether righteous or altogether wicked. in a generation that is altogether righteous, — as it is written, “Thy people also shall be all righteous: they shall inherit the land for ever.” Or altogether wicked, — as it is written, “And he saw that there was no man, and wondered that there was no intercessor;” and it is [elsewhere] written, “For mine own sake, even for mine own sake, will I do it.”[6]

The Talmud tells many stories about the Messiah, some of which represent famous Talmudic rabbis as receiving personal visitations from Elijah the Prophet and the Messiah. For example:

R. Joshua b. Levi met Elijah standing by the entrance of R. Simeon b. Yohai’s tomb. He asked him: “Have I a portion in the world to come?” He replied, “if this Master desires it.” R. Joshua b. Levi said, “I saw two, but heard the voice of a third.” He then asked him, “When will the Messiah come?” — “Go and ask him himself,” was his reply. “Where is he sitting?” — “At the entrance.” “And by what sign may I recognise him?” — “He is sitting among the poor lepers: all of them untie [them] all at once, and rebandage them together, whereas he unties and rebandages each separately, [before treating the next], thinking, should I be wanted, [it being time for my appearance as the Messiah] I must not be delayed [through having to bandage a number of sores].” So he went to him and greeted him, saying, “Peace upon thee, Master and Teacher.” “Peace upon thee, O son of Levi,” he replied. “When wilt thou come, Master?” asked he. “Today,” was his answer. On his returning to Elijah, the latter enquired, “What did he say to thee?” — “peace Upon thee, O son of Levi,” he answered. Thereupon he [Elijah] observed, “He thereby assured thee and thy father of [a portion in] the world to come.” “He spoke falsely to me,” he rejoined, “stating that he would come today, but has not.” He [Elijah] answered him, “This is what he said to thee, To-day, if ye will listen to his voice.”[6]